Volume 28 – Issue 4 (Dec 1963)

Allium ampeloprasum L. in Illinois

In the winter of 1963 while some herbarium work was being done at the Chicago Natural History Museum, a specimen of Allium was observed which had been identified by the collectors as A. vineale L. The length of the pedicels, the absence of bulbils in the inflorescence, and the number of flowers in the inflorescence were unlike those characteristics of A. vineale, and a closer look at this specimen revealed that its true identity was A. ampeloprasum. In this specimen, the leaves were one centimeter or more wide and flattened, while in A. vineale, the leaves are terete and hollow with their width rarely exceeding half a centimeter even in robust specimens. This sheet was, therefore, annotated with the proper identification.

Read / Download Full Article »

Cleistogamy in Salvia Lyrata

The frequently weedy Salvia lyrata L., of the eastern United States, flowers chasmogamously from April to July. This species also regularly flowers cleistogamously in late summer, after the season of open flowering, a fact apparently not previously reported in the literature.

Read / Download Full Article »

Mosses from Lower Alabama and Mississippi

Of the five states bordering on the Gulf of Mexico only one, Mississippi, has never received any attention with regard to its moss flora. By way of contrast, it may be noted that to the east the mosses of Florida have received considerable notice in the past, with a checklist published in 1944 by Schornherst (Breen) and a moss flora of the state, but recently published (1963) after many years of work, by the same author. Numerous other papers by many authors have also contributed to our knowledge of the mosses of Florida. The neighboring state of Alabama has a checklist of its bryophytes, published in 1901 by Charles Mohr, which, although badly out of date nomenclaturally, is of course very useful. A paper by Romm (1937) and several intriguing reports by Harvill (1949, 1950, 1951, 1952) have added further to our knowledge of the mosses of Alabama. The mosses

Read / Download Full Article »

Pteridophytes of the Mountain Lake Area, Giles County, Virginia, Including Notes From Whitetop Mountain

The Mountain Lake Biological Station is located at approximately 4,000 feet altitude on Salt Pond Mountain, Giles County, Virginia. Since its establishment the Station has been a center for biological field research in southwestern Virginia. For work on lower vascular plants it is well located in that there are diverse habitats available within a half-hour’s drive from the station. A number of the existing problems concerning eastern American pteridophytes can be investigated in this area. This report contains the major results of a five-week intensive study, beginning on July 19, 1962. It is hoped that the information presented here will have, not only scientific value per se, but will contribute to teaching and encourage future research in this area. A number of new additions to the local pteridophyte flora were made during this study and these supplement the earlier reports of Massey (1960) and Thorne and Cooperrider (1960). Special attention

Read / Download Full Article »