Volume 29 – Issue 3 (Sep 1964)

Distribution Patterns of Ohio Cruciferae

The Ohio Cruciferae may be divided into three general groups, (1) the indigenous flora, (2) the introduced flora or “weeds” and (3) the escaped cultivars. The purpose of this paper is threefold, (1) to provide an annotated list of Cruciferae of Ohio with an accompanying list of synonyms, (2) to provide a record of distribution by counties and (3) to correlate distribution with Ohio’s soil regions.

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A Comparison of Phytolacca americana and P. rigida

Poke or Pokeweed, Phytolacca americana L., is a common and well-known weed throughout eastern United States. Phytolacca rigida Small is limited to the lower Coastal Plain of southeastern United States. Although I tend to consider these as distinct, the validity of P. rigida, at least as a species, is questionable. Careful study of the populations, utilizing modern techniques, should be able to resolve this problem without too much difficulty. The observations which follow are published in the hope that they may lead to a more thorough investigation by someone able to make the necessary field observations of P. rigida. Interest in this problem arose from a survey of Phytolacca as a genus of poisonous plants in North Carolina (Hardin, 1961) and from my collections of the two species in Georgia and Florida.

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Primary Aquatic Succession and Floristics of Devil’s Kitchen Lake, Illinois

This study of the aquatic vascular plants of Devil’s Kitchen Lake, Williamson County, Illinois, was undertaken to identify additional species, to investigate aquatic succession, and to contrast the results with those of Mohlenbrock, et al. (1962) on the basis of their publication that record.ed the flora of this lake during the period of initial filling, subsequent to impoundment. Since the water in Devil’s Kitchen Lake had not attained maximum depth at the time of Mohlenbrock, et al. (l.c.) study in the fall of 1960, they unavoidably failed to identify typical aquatic forms commonly represented in the more mature eutrophic lakes of the area. Not until March, 1961, following heavy spring rains, did Devil’s Kitchen Lake overflow the basin at the spillway. Thus, the opportunity to gain a greater understanding of primary succession in newly impounded waters of southern Illinois and to update the list of aquatic plants in Devil’s Kitchen

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Quantitative Studies in Angiosperm Taxonomy. X. Valeriana. XI. Geranium. XII. Mimulus

For several years I have been engaged, with the assistance of my students, in the study of morphological variation in various angiosperm genera. We have utilized a series of “numerical” techniques in the belief that we thereby attained a greater degree of accuracy and objectiveness that is possible by more conventional techniques. The present paper is an account of studies in three genera, Mimulus, Valeriana, and Geranium. These studies were carried out during the summer of 1961 at the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory at Gothic, Gunnison County, Colorado, and most of the plant samples utilized were obtained in the vicinity of the Laboratory, in the Upper East River Basin, at elevations in the neighborhood of 9500′.

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Taxa Collected from Roanoke Island New to the Flora of North Carolina

All taxa listed in this paper have been collected and identified by the author in connection with a floristic study of Roanoke Island in Dare County, North Carolina. Verification of the author’s identifications has been made by H. L. Blomquist, of Duke University (grasses), H. R. Totten, University of North Carolina (trees), H. E. Ahles and A. E. Radford, University of North Carolina (all others), to whom thanks are expressed. J. E. Adams’ critical review of the manuscript is especially appreciated.

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